3Ws – Shelley Roden

Shelley

What do you create?

I create and perform sounds in sync to picture for film, television, and video games. For each project, as the Foley “Artist” I perform the footsteps of characters as well as anything they touch, handle, or fall and move upon. A Foley Mixer simultaneously records these performances using two or more microphones. Sometimes I use the actual prop that you see on screen to create the sound. For example, if a character picks up a drinking glass off of a wood surface, I pick up a drinking glass off of a wood surface. In this instance, the creative opportunities are in the performance and the finesse of that object. Other creative challenges are presented when I have to invent a sound from the found materials on the Foley stage. For example, I recently created the sound of a leg being sawed off using a pine cone and a wet chamois.

 

Why do you create?

Our Foley team (consisting of two Artists and one Mixer) breathes life into moving pictures by capturing organic sounds to sell the idea that what you are seeing on the screen is real. We also create larger-than-life sounds to give specific moments an intended emotional impact. I enjoy connecting with each character and helping bring to life the emotions and movements they are trying to convey. I thrive on the physical challenges of lifting and slamming heavy things, or running without being able to audibly breathe for a minute-long chase scene. I love trying to achieve the balance between focusing on the details of what I must mimic on the screen and letting go so that each performance flows seamlessly and naturally. My ear enjoys participating as the musical critic, analyzing the textures and rhythms of each sound created in the moment of each performance. Most of all, I love the fun of being active and making noises, as I have needed an outlet for that since I was a child.

 

What do you consume?

My desire to make noises to accompany pictures was first influenced by “Tom and Jerry” cartoons. The musical sound effects were sufficient in communicating emotions without using words. I found this liberating, because as a young child I felt as Charlie Chaplin did when he said, “words seem so futile, so feeble.” During my childhood, comedy duos Laurel and Hardy as well as Abbot and Costello were my heroes. Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton have recently joined that list. I do love words very much now, and if I went to Ithaca College twenty years earlier than I did, perhaps I would have taken Rod Serling’s screenwriting class and become a writer. My favorite reads are young adult novels because they convey complex ideas so simply and succinctly. I revisit “The Witch of Blackbird Pond”‘ “A Solitary Blue”, and “The Trumpet of the Swan” again and again. I also enjoy fables, myths, and fairy tales by Herman Hesse and Grimm. I am drawn to plays like Paddy Chayefsky’s “Marty” or August Strindberg’s “Miss Julie”. I indulge in serious film works by Ingmar Bergman, Carl Theodore Dreyer, and Akira Kurosawa, yet I also thoroughly enjoy films that celebrate life and its joys, like “The Music Man”, satirical films such as “A Nous la Liberte”, and of course anything with Buster Keaton or Charlie Chaplin.

 

Links

IMDB: Shelley Roden

3Ws – Tony DeSare

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What do you create?

I’m a singer/songwriter/pianist and have been writing songs since I was 18 years old. I create music, both songs with music and lyrics and improvised solos in the moment when playing piano. These are two very distinct thrills for me. Writing a song is like having one idea that excites me and spending the next hours, days, months or years putting together a complete sonic picture like someone may work on a puzzle. Then with an improvised piano solo, the creation is a free flow of ideas that are born of the moment with no right or wrong.

The last few years, I turned a life long love of films into learning how to shoot and edit my own videos to go along with my music, which has been a very exciting thing for me to blend with my first love.

Why do you create?

I think we all as humans have an inborn to desire to create. There is something that we all tap into that scientists don’t have a name for yet, but it is a real thing. One of the gifts we are given as humans is the ability to manipulate the physical forms around us to create something new. Whether it be knitting a sweater, a structure made of wood and nails, organized colored oils on canvas or producing and manipulating sound waves in an organized way. The latter is what I love to do and the way I express my primal urge to create. I don’t always initially want to create, because it can be painful and tedious but there is nothing I enjoy more than working on something when an idea catches fire in my mind. My creative life has become a constant tension of opposites while I try to increase my musical dexterity and skill level while at the same time making my best effort to let go of all of it and just let that creative consciousness work through me.

What do you consume?

I tend to be drawn to creative works that trigger some sort of inspiration in me to want to create myself. I’m especially drawn to films because it is such a blend of so many creative forms all presented as a single experience. For a film to be a success artistically, the director must herd a team of creative people and inspire and align them to his creative vision. Each person has a history of creating and years of work in his or her craft. The actors, cinematographer, writer, makeup, wardrobe stylist and composer (wihich I especially love) all have a lifetime of inspiration and work they pull from to make a piece that communicates a specific emotion. That’s why making a great film is such a difficult and rare achievement. Often after I experience a great film I instantly want to get to my piano and create something.

I also appreciate anything that is born of a pure creative spirit, be it a dining experience, a great joke or even a perfect tweet. The key being something that has a fearless quality but is not taking risks just for the sake of being risky.

Links

 

3Ws – Kevin Venardos

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What do you create?

I make Circus. That covers a lot of ground, but I don’t take credit for it all… just for seeing that it gets done well wherever that VENARDOS sign is hanging. It takes an army of talent to make a Circus. And for all the artists, props, rigging, equipment, music, light, choreography, design, marketing, blood, sweat and tears that go into taking an idea all the way to a real production that can actually touch the hearts of others… well, at the end of the day, there really is only one thing we make. Memories. But the really good ones stay with you, sometimes forever. Those are the memories I want to make for other people. I want to help break down walls with our little joyous operation, by showing others, just by our presence, that anything is possible if you work hard and you never, never, ever give up.

 

Why do you create?

If I knew the answer to that question, maybe I would have chosen an easier road. I’ll let my good friend Kermit the Frog answer it for me:

“Have you been half asleep, and have you heard voices?
I’ve heard them calling my name. 
Just like the sweet song that calls the young sailor, 
The voice might be one and the same. 
And I’ve heard it too many times to ignore it. 
It’s something that I’m supposed to be.”

 

 

What do you consume?

Experience, in large quantities. Hours tuned in to NPR. The New York Times. When seeking inspiration for a new piece/act/video I consume LOTS of music. Music is probably my greatest source of inspiration. Inside that meter, I find order and structure that allows my creativity to blossom. Apples. Gala and Fuji are my favorites.

Links

Website: www.VenardosCircus.com

Twitter: @kevinvenardos

Facebook: www.facebook.com/kevin.venardos

Instagram: www.instagram.com/venardos

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/kevinvenardos